All Relations between spatial frequency and primary visual cortex

Reference Sentence Publish Date Extraction Date Species
Nathan C L Kong, Eshed Margalit, Justin L Gardner, Anthony M Norci. Increasing neural network robustness improves match to macaque V1 eigenspectrum, spatial frequency preference and predictivity. PLoS computational biology vol 18 issue 1 2022 34995280 They also suggest that it may be useful to penalize slow-decaying eigenspectra or to bias models to extract features of lower spatial frequencies during task-optimization in order to improve robustness and V1 neural response predictivity. 2022-01-07 2022-01-09 monkey
Nathan C L Kong, Eshed Margalit, Justin L Gardner, Anthony M Norci. Increasing neural network robustness improves match to macaque V1 eigenspectrum, spatial frequency preference and predictivity. PLoS computational biology vol 18 issue 1 2022 34995280 We therefore investigated the spatial frequency tuning of artificial neurons and found that a large proportion of them preferred high spatial frequencies and that robust models had preferred spatial frequency distributions more aligned with the measured spatial frequency distribution of macaque V1 cells. 2022-01-07 2022-01-09 monkey
A Bergeron, E Tardif, F Lepore, J P Guillemo. Spatial and temporal matching of receptive field properties of binocular cells in area 19 of the cat. Neuroscience vol 86 issue 1 1998 9692748 Spatial resolution (mean=0.75 c/degree), optimal spatial frequencies (mean=0.16 c/degree) were relatively low and spatial bandwidths (mean=2.1 octaves) were broader as compared to those of cells in area 17 but comparable to those of cells in other extrastriate areas. 1998-10-20 2022-01-08 Not clear
R M Everson, A K Prashanth, M Gabbay, B W Knight, L Sirovich, E Kapla. Representation of spatial frequency and orientation in the visual cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America vol 95 issue 14 1998 9653187 Here, we report results from a study of the cat primary visual cortex in which we employed a new image-analysis method that allows improved separation of signal from noise and that we used to examine the neurooptical response of the primary visual cortex to drifting sine gratings over a range of orientations and spatial frequencies. 1998-08-06 2022-01-08 Not clear
R M Everson, A K Prashanth, M Gabbay, B W Knight, L Sirovich, E Kapla. Representation of spatial frequency and orientation in the visual cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America vol 95 issue 14 1998 9653187 Knowledge of the response of the primary visual cortex to the various spatial frequencies and orientations in the visual scene should help us understand the principles by which the brain recognizes patterns. 1998-08-06 2022-01-08 Not clear
C Casanova, T Savard, S Darvea. Contribution of area 17 to cell responses in the striate-recipient zone of the cat's lateral posterior-pulvinar complex. The European journal of neuroscience vol 9 issue 5 1997 9182955 For only three LPl cells, the effects of inactivation of the visual cortex were restricted to specific spatial frequencies, altering the profile of the spatial frequency tuning function. 1997-07-21 2022-01-08 Not clear
T R Vidyasagar, A Muelle. Function of GABAA inhibition in specifying spatial frequency and orientation selectivities in cat striate cortex. Experimental brain research vol 98 issue 1 1994 8013589 Since many geniculate cells are tuned for stimulus orientation at higher spatial frequencies, suppression of the low-spatial-frequency component would remove some of the orientation non-specific response in striate cortical cells and contribute to their orientation selectivity. 1994-07-27 2022-01-07 Not clear
M S Gizzi, E Katz, J A Movsho. Spatial and temporal analysis by neurons in the representation of the central visual field in the cat's lateral suprasylvian visual cortex. Visual neuroscience vol 5 issue 5 1991 2288895 In agreement with previous reports, the optimal spatial frequencies for LS neurons covered a wider range than is seen in either area 17 or 18 alone (0.05-1 cycle/deg), but are certainly included in the range covered by both these afferent areas. 1991-04-01 2022-01-07 Not clear
C L Baker, A Baydala, N Zeitoun. Optimal displacement in apparent motion. Vision research vol 29 issue 7 1990 2623827 The range of effective spatial frequencies does not correspond to the range of optimal spatial frequencies reported for neurons in primate Area V1, but does correspond to that for Area V2. 1990-03-29 2022-01-07 Not clear
L C Silveira, C A Heywood, A Cowe. Direct and transcallosal contribution to the cortical visual evoked response in rats. Behavioural brain research vol 31 issue 3 1989 2914081 The averaged visually evoked cortical potential (VECP) in response to contrast reversal of a grating was measured on striate cortex over a range of spatial frequencies and contrasts. 1989-03-22 2022-01-07 rat
B D Schwartz, D B Mallott, D K Winstea. Preattentive deficit in temporal processing by chronic schizophrenics. Biological psychiatry vol 23 issue 7 1988 3370263 Sustained cells respond slowly and selectively to high spatial frequencies and are believed to be responsible for the "oblique effect" (i.e., reduced responsiveness to obliquely oriented high spatial frequencies), which likely occurs at the striate cortex. 1988-06-24 2022-01-07 Not clear
T R Vidyasaga. A model of striate response properties based on geniculate anisotropies. Biological cybernetics vol 57 issue 1-2 1987 3620539 An inhibitory mechanism that suppresses the responses to low spatial frequencies would leave a striate cell receiving a biased geniculate input with an orientation sensitivity at the higher spatial frequencies. 1987-10-20 2022-01-07 Not clear
T J Zumbroich, C Blakemor. Spatial and temporal selectivity in the suprasylvian visual cortex of the cat. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience vol 7 issue 2 1987 3819821 The optimum spatial frequencies (average about 0.2 cycles/deg) were low compared to the values reported for striate cortex but similar to those for area 18. 1987-04-01 2022-01-07 Not clear
K Kr\\xc3\\xbcger, H Heitl\\xc3\\xa4nder-Fansa, H Dinse, G Berlucch. Detection performance of normal cats and those lacking areas 17 and 18: a behavioral approach to analyse pattern recognition deficits. Experimental brain research vol 63 issue 2 1986 3530792 It is concluded that although pattern recognition can be performed successfully by cats lacking areas 17 and 18, these cortical areas probably make an essential contribution to this function under natural conditions in two ways: because of the X-type input of area 17, they increase the acuity of the system by making it more sensitive to higher spatial frequencies, and they permit detection of patterns at much lower S/N ratios i.e. 1986-11-13 2022-01-07 Not clear
I Ohzawa, R D Freema. Pattern evoked potentials from the cat's retina. Journal of neurophysiology vol 54 issue 3 1985 4045545 On the other hand, sinusoidal phase reversal reveals a clear attenuation of the pattern ERG amplitude at low spatial frequencies, whereas this type of stimulation produces very poor responses from LGN and visual cortex. 1985-11-05 2022-01-07 Not clear
M A Webster, R L De Valoi. Relationship between spatial-frequency and orientation tuning of striate-cortex cells. Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics and image science vol 2 issue 7 1985 4020509 If striate cells had the receptive-field (RF) shapes classically attributed to them, their preferred spatial frequencies would vary considerably with orientation. 1985-09-13 2022-01-07 Not clear
N N Zislina, L I Fil'chikova, Iu I Levkovich, O Iu Batyr\\. [Effect of the spatial frequency of sinusoidal gratings on amplitude and temporal parameters of visual evoked potentials in man]. Zhurnal vysshei nervnoi deiatelnosti imeni I P Pavlova vol 34 issue 5 1985 6506863 The EP configuration in response to sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequencies determined by the dominance of the early or late EP complex is supposed to reflect involvement of independent mechanisms of processing of information on low or high spatial frequency differently localized in the visual cortex. 1985-01-24 2022-01-07 human
R M Camard. Are simple striate cells analysers of visual signals both in spatial position as well as in spatial frequency? Italian journal of neurological sciences vol 5 issue 3 1985 6500898 Since the quantitative analysis of the spatial organization of simple cell receptive fields has shown that the receptive fields of these cells are made up of two to four antagonistic subregions it follows that striate simple cells are concerned with the analysis of only a selected range of spatial frequencies. 1985-01-04 2022-01-07 Not clear
R M Camard. Are simple striate cells analysers of visual signals both in spatial position as well as in spatial frequency? Italian journal of neurological sciences vol 5 issue 3 1985 6500898 According to a modern view, simple cells of the cat striate cortex are considered to operate as a part of Fourier analysis system thus leading to the idea that the operational mechanism of the visual cortex is concerned with the analysis of spatial frequencies. 1985-01-04 2022-01-07 Not clear
R M Camard. Are simple striate cells analysers of visual signals both in spatial position as well as in spatial frequency? Italian journal of neurological sciences vol 5 issue 3 1985 6500898 Therefore striate simple cells must be considered analysers of visual signals both in spatial frequencies as well as in spatial positions. 1985-01-04 2022-01-07 Not clear
L G Thorell, R L De Valois, D G Albrech. Spatial mapping of monkey V1 cells with pure color and luminance stimuli. Vision research vol 24 issue 7 1984 6464367 We show that (a) the vast majority of primate striate cells respond to pure color stimuli, in addition to responding to luminance-varying stimuli (b) in general, simple cells are color-selective whereas complex cells respond to multiple color regions, (c) most cortical cells show bandpass spatial frequency tuning to pure color-varying gratings, with various cells tuned to each of a wide range of spatial frequencies and (d) the peak spatial frequency and bandwidth of most striate cells is the same for color as for luminance-varying gratings; when they differ, cells tend to be more broadly tuned and peak at lower spatial frequencies for color (e) complex cells, on the average, respond to higher spatial frequencies than do simple cells. 1984-09-19 2022-01-07 monkey
Iu E Shelepi. [Correlation of topographic and spatial-frequency characteristics of the lateral suprasylvian region and the striate cortex in the cat]. Neirofiziologiia = Neurophysiology vol 16 issue 1 1984 6717677 It means that low spatial frequencies are transferred more quickly in that area than high spatial frequencies in the striate cortex. 1984-05-30 2022-01-07 Not clear
N V Prazdnikova, V D Gleze. [Mechanisms of visual generalization]. Zhurnal vysshei nervnoi deiatelnosti imeni I P Pavlova vol 33 issue 5 1984 6649884 But the results are predicted quantitatively by the hypothesis of description of images by receptive fields of the visual cortex as by two-dimensional filtres tuned to different spatial frequencies and orientations. 1984-01-07 2022-01-07 Not clear
D J Tolhurst, I D Thompso. Organization of neurones preferring similar spatial frequencies in cat striate cortex. Experimental brain research vol 48 issue 2 1983 7173359 Organization of neurones preferring similar spatial frequencies in cat striate cortex. 1983-02-25 2022-01-07 Not clear
D J Tolhurst, I D Thompso. Organization of neurones preferring similar spatial frequencies in cat striate cortex. Experimental brain research vol 48 issue 2 1983 7173359 The optimal spatial frequencies were determined for over 300 neurones in cat striate cortex. 1983-02-25 2022-01-07 Not clear
W Singer, J P Rauschecke. Central core control of developmental plasticity in the kitten visual cortex: II. Electrical activation of mesencephalic and diencephalic projections. Experimental brain research vol 47 issue 2 1982 7117447 Throughout the conditioning period, the ocular dominance of neurons in the visual cortex was determined from evoked potentials that were elicited either with electric stimulation of the optic nerves or with phase reversing gratings of variable spatial frequencies. 1982-12-02 2022-01-07 Not clear
P Dea. Visual pathways and acuity hooded rats. Behavioural brain research vol 3 issue 2 1981 7271990 The results suggested the following conclusions: (i) The pathways from retina to striate cortex via dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) conveys information about high spatial frequencies sufficient for normal detection of these gratings, that is up to about 1 cycles/deg. 1981-11-22 2022-01-07 rat
A Cattaneo, L Maffei, C Morron. Two firing patterns in the discharge of complex cells encoding different attributes of the visual stimulus. Experimental brain research vol 43 issue 1 1981 7250256 The activity of complex neurones of area 17 was recorded in anaesthetized cats in response to sinusoidal drifting gratings of various orientations, spatial frequencies and contrasts. 1981-09-25 2022-01-07 Not clear
P Dea. Grating detection and visual acuity after lesions of striate cortex in hooded rats. Experimental brain research vol 43 issue 2 1981 7250262 The ability of rats to detect high-contrast square-wave gratings over a range of spatial frequencies was measured before and after ablation of striate cortex. 1981-09-22 2022-01-07 rat
D G Albrecht, R L De Valois, L G Thorel. Visual cortical neurons: are bars or gratings the optimal stimuli? Science (New York, N.Y.) vol 207 issue 4426 1980 6765993 Neurons in the visual cortex of monkeys and cats have been characterized as either (i) bar and edge detectors or (ii) cells selective for certain spatial frequencies. 1980-02-26 2022-01-07 monkey
V D Glezer, T A Shcherbach, V E Gauzel'ma. [Receptive fields of the visual cortex--detectors or filters of spatial frequencies?]. Neirofiziologiia = Neurophysiology vol 11 issue 5 1980 514404 [Receptive fields of the visual cortex--detectors or filters of spatial frequencies?]. 1980-02-15 2022-01-07 Not clear
L Maffei, C Morrone, M Pirchio, G Sandin. A perceptual phenomenon and its neurophysiological correlate. Perception vol 8 issue 1 1979 432079 The neurons of the visual cortex of the cat, in a given range of spatial frequencies characteristic of each cell, give similar responses to the two gratings. 1979-06-11 2022-01-07 Not clear
J A Movshon, I D Thompson, D J Tolhurs. Spatial and temporal contrast sensitivity of neurones in areas 17 and 18 of the cat's visual cortex. The Journal of physiology vol 283 issue 1979 722570 Neurones in area 18 preferred spatial frequencies that were, on average, one third as high as those preferred by area 17 neurones at the same retinal eccentricity. 1979-02-23 2022-01-07 Not clear
D A Pollen, S F Ronne. Periodic excitability changes across the receptive fields of complex cells in the striate and parastriate cortex of the cat. The Journal of physiology vol 245 issue 3 1975 1142223 Spatial frequencies for the periodic component of the receptive field for area 17 cells in the central visual area covered a range of three octaves up to 5 cycles/degree, and area 18 cells included another octave on the low frequency side. 1975-10-10 2022-01-07 Not clear
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